Inadvertent Buddhist Teachings V

Brought to you by Eliphas Lévi:

“He looks on the wicked as invalids whom one must pity and cure; the world, with its errors and vices, is to him [a] hospital, and he wishes to serve in it.”

“They are without fears and without desires, dominated by no falsehood, sharing no error, loving without illusion, suffering without impatience, reposing in the quietude of eternal thought….. a Magus cannot be ignorant, for magic implies superiority, mastership, majority, and majority signifies emancipation […] he is lord of his own happiness, and expects or fears nothing from the caprice of fortune. He can love without being beloved; he can create imperishable treasures […] He possesses that which he seeks, namely, profound peace. He regrets nothing which must end, but remembers with satisfaction that he has met with good in all […] he is a child with children, joyous with the young, staid with the old, patient with the foolish, happy with the wise […] applauding strength, he is yet indulgent to weakness; offending no one, he has himself no need to pardon, for he never thinks himself offended; he pities those who misconceive him, and seeks an opportunity to serve them; by the force of kindness only does he avenge himself on the ungrateful”

“Judge not; speak hardly at all; love and act.”

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